[QUOTE=Ywa;20370159]Can that be blamed on the server host? If you have a dedicated server, you're responsible to keep your software up-to-date and protect it. The company is only responsible for hardware faults.[/QUOTE] They don't pack a line firewall without hefty (£20/m + £150 setup costs) Though, I personally think the problem was Fizzadar having RD passwords in his email, which he used the same password for as the password he used when he registered to RoleNation.


[QUOTE=Ywa;20370159]Can that be blamed on the server host? If you have a dedicated server, you're responsible to keep your software up-to-date and protect it. The company is only responsible for hardware faults.[/QUOTE] They don't pack a line firewall without hefty (£20/m + £150 setup costs) Though, I personally think the problem was Fizzadar having RD passwords in his email, which he used the same password for as the password he used when he registered to RoleNation.
Dedicated servers need security options so that you can protect your website against hackers, viruses, and breakage. Firewall configurations are important but time-consuming. Some hosting providers will provide extra built-in security features, so you do not have to worry about it and get started with your server without any security to install except for additional options that you may want.
To date, no industry standards have been set to clearly define the management role of dedicated server providers. What this means is that each provider will use industry standard terms, but each provider will define them differently. For some dedicated server providers, fully managed is defined as having a web based control panel while other providers define it as having dedicated system engineers readily available to handle all server and network related functions of the dedicated server provider.

A cursory glance at the many web hosting services we've listed here reveals many similar-looking offerings, but the discerning eye will identify some subtle differences. You'll want a dedicated server with significant amounts of disk space—preferably 1TB or more—for storing files. You can typically choose either a traditional hard drive or a solid-state drive as your website's storage medium. There's a trade-off, however. Solid-state drives are often faster and more reliable than HDDs, but they cost more money and have smaller storage capacities. Traditional hard drives, on the other hand, have large capacities and lower prices but aren't quite as resilient as their SSD counterparts. Unless you truly need blazingly fast storage, a traditional hard drive will get the job done.
For packages supporting unmetered disk space or data transfer (bandwidth), we do not have defined limitations. These resources are "unmetered", meaning you are not billed according to the amount of disk space or bandwidth used. While of course these resources are not infinite, we believe our customers should have all the resources necessary to build an online presence and 99.95% of customers will have more than enough disk space and bandwidth to meet their needs.
If you register a domain with Bluehost when signing up for a hosting account, there is a domain fee that is non-refundable. This not only covers our costs, but ensures that you won't lose your domain name. Regardless of the status of your hosting service, you'll be free to manage it, transfer it after any required lock periods, or simply point it elsewhere at your convenience. You retain ownership of your domain until the end of its registration period unless you elect to extend it. 
Support for any of these operating systems typically depends on the level of management offered with a particular dedicated server plan. Operating system support may include updates to the core system in order to acquire the latest security fixes, patches, and system-wide vulnerability resolutions. Updates to core operating systems include kernel upgrades, service packs, application updates, and security patches that keep the server secure and safe. Operating system updates and support relieves the burden of server management from the dedicated server owner.
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