What I would do is setup the tower so it plays with the best possible performance. As nobody will be playing on it you can pull all the graphics down to their minimums. I'd set it up with a password initially until you can create a small central base with a bed where the main character will respawn and then make it player proof (dbl steel walls and off the ground).
Indeed you don't - because renting one dedicated server box that you can run two full 80-man Squad servers on doesn't cost that amount of money; more like +/- $150, the exact amount depending on who you go with / what sort of rig you want to rent. If you only want to run one 80-man server, for example, you can go for a cheaper package and get one for around $100.
We not only install your operating system's security patches, we also proactively check and confirm they are updated for limited security risks. Additionally, we update your cPanel so you always have access to the newest and most stable cPanel & WHM features. Our 2-hour hardware replacement guarantee is an additional peace-of-mind service, where we replace any faulty hardware within 2 hours of notification.

Ok, buddy, are you having an aneurism? This thread wasn't made to promote anyone or anything - it was made to dispel misleading bullcrap from shitty, unscrupulous GSPs and try and encourage more people getting a dedicated box, after the constant pain we regularly see when yet another poor sap gets crap performance with no refund after cancellation of service from a GSP in the Squad server host community. Time and again we see the same complaints from people, about the same companies that prey on people with little technical know-how that just want to run a game server.

Prominent players in the dedicated server market offer large amounts of bandwidth ranging from 500 gigabytes to 3000 gigabytes using the “overselling” model. It is not uncommon for major players to provide dedicated servers with 1Terabyte (TB) of bandwidth or higher. Usage models based on the byte level measurement usually include a given amount of bandwidth with each server and a price per gigabyte after a certain threshold has been reached. Expect to pay additional fees for bandwidth overage usage. For example, if a dedicated server has been given 3000 gigabytes of bandwidth per month and the customer uses 5000 gigabytes of bandwidth within the billing period, the additional 2000 gigabytes of bandwidth will be invoiced as bandwidth overage. Each provider has a different model for billing. No industry standards have been set yet.
In the Web hosting business, a dedicated server refers to the rental and exclusive use of a computer that includes a Web server, related software, and connection to the Internet, housed in the Web hosting company's premises. A dedicated server is usually needed for a Web site (or set of related company sites) that may develop a considerable amount of traffic - for example, a site that must handle up to 35 million hits a day. The server can usually be configured and operated remotely from the client company. Web hosting companies claim that the use of a dedicated server on their premises saves router, Internet connection, security system, and network administration costs.
Dedicated servers need security options so that you can protect your website against hackers, viruses, and breakage. Firewall configurations are important but time-consuming. Some hosting providers will provide extra built-in security features, so you do not have to worry about it and get started with your server without any security to install except for additional options that you may want.
Availability, price and employee familiarity often determines which operating systems are offered on dedicated servers. Variations of Linux and Unix (open source operating systems) are often included at no charge to the customer. Commercial operating systems include Microsoft Windows Server, provided through a special program called Microsoft SPLA. Red Hat Enterprise is a commercial version of Linux offered to hosting providers on a monthly fee basis. The monthly fee provides OS updates through the Red Hat Network using an application called Yum. Other operating systems are available from the open source community at no charge. These include CentOS, Fedora Core, Debian, and many other Linux distributions or BSD systems FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD.
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