[QUOTE=brocko;20363312]You could buy an old server and colo. RapidSwitch has a nice deal for £36 per month. [url]http://www.rapidswitch.com/Colocation.aspx[/url][/QUOTE] For colocation, I wouldn't go with RapidSwitch unless you have serious money to burn. While they're a very good and very professional host, there's a few hidden costs which they don't exactly tell you about when you sign up. Have a look at killercreation.co.uk. The guy who runs that - Justin - is possibly the nicest person you could ever meet. They also do standard dedicated servers which are a little more expensive than RapidSwitch, but the attitude of the company outweighs that imo. Where RapidSwitch are extremely professional, KillerCreation are much more down to earth and friendly.
Adam, from QuadraNet, is back with an exclusive dedicated server offer to celebrate the opening of their new datacenter in Los Angeles, and their redesigned website. QuadraNet is a datacenter which has been operating since 2001. QuadraNet operates its own datacenter facilities with its own network infrastructure (AS8100), equipment and IP space. Every order includes […]

Additionally, you'll want a web hosting service that offers Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) if you plan to sell products. Here's why: An SSL connection encrypts the data that travels between your site and users' web browsers, thus safeguarding the transmission of purchasing information. You've probably seen a green padlock in your web browser's address bar while logging into your online bank account or making online purchases. It's a symbol of trust. Some companies include a free SSL certificate when you sign up for a hosting plan, while others charge close to $100. You can save some money by shopping around for the services that offer the cheapest SSL plans.
Lastly, what kind of support does the hosting provider give to the customer? Customer support should be 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, especially if you are running an online business or a game that supports multiple users. You will want a hosting provider that makes it easy to get in touch should something go wrong or you want to upgrade before something does go wrong.
But a company looking for more power and control may need a service provider who offers dedicated hosting. With dedicated hosting, a client rents a server from a dedicated hosting provider, and has exclusive use of that server’s resources. The provider works with the client to give them the CPU, RAM, and disk space that they need. The provider builds and maintains the server, eliminating a  business’ upfront cost of purchasing their own.

To date, no industry standards have been set to clearly define the management role of dedicated server providers. What this means is that each provider will use industry standard terms, but each provider will define them differently. For some dedicated server providers, fully managed is defined as having a web based control panel while other providers define it as having dedicated system engineers readily available to handle all server and network related functions of the dedicated server provider.
Bandwidth consumption over the last several years has shifted from a per megabit usage model to a per gigabyte usage model. Bandwidth was traditionally measured in line speed access that included the ability to purchase needed megabits at a given monthly cost. As the shared hosting model developed, the trend towards gigabyte or total bytes transferred, replaced the megabit line speed model so dedicated server providers started offering per gigabyte.
Recently, we've added more formal uptime monitoring to our review process, and the results show that most Web hosts do an excellent job of keeping sites up and running. If they don't, they suffer for it in our scoring. Even if they get everything else right, sites with uptime problems aren't eligible for high scores. All services suffer ups and downs, sometimes for reasons beyond their control. Those sites that fail to address the problem are penalized accordingly.
You'll also want to consider how long you'll need dedicated web hosting. If it's a short-term project—say, less than a month or two—you'll typically receive a refund should you cancel your hosting within 60 days. Some companies offer 30-day money-back guarantees, while others offer 90-day money-back guarantees. Once again, it's beneficial to do your homework.
The game hosting companies cost maybe 20 - 30 dollars less than going the dedicated route, while you get the lovely priviledge of having to share the hardware you're on with other customers also paying for sub-par performance, too many instances running on the machine you're on. This results in crap performance (read: unplayable) for games that place a high demand on servers, especially in the case of Squad, with regular dips in server TPS to levels where rubberbanding of everything occurs. Aside from having to share your hardware, there's the fact many of you game hosting providers knowingly advertise specific hardware as capable of running Squad and offer "Squad servers" for rent that have CPUs that are known and tested to be too slow in IPC / single core performance to properly run the game with a full 80-man server.
A dedicated hosting service, dedicated server, or managed hosting service is a type of Internet hosting in which the client leases an entire server not shared with anyone else. This is more flexible than shared hosting, as organizations have full control over the server(s), including choice of operating system, hardware, etc. There is also another level of dedicated or managed hosting commonly referred to as complex managed hosting. Complex Managed Hosting applies to both physical dedicated servers, Hybrid server and virtual servers, with many companies choosing a hybrid (combination of physical and virtual) hosting solution. There are many similarities between standard and complex managed hosting but the key difference is the level of administrative and engineering support that the customer pays for – owing to both the increased size and complexity of the infrastructure deployment. The provider steps in to take over most of the management, including security, memory, storage and IT support. The service is primarily proactive in nature.[1] Server administration can usually be provided by the hosting company as an add-on service. In some cases a dedicated server can offer less overhead and a larger return on investment. Dedicated servers are most often housed in data centers, similar to colocation facilities, providing redundant power sources and HVAC systems. In contrast to colocation, the server hardware is owned by the provider and in some cases they will provide support for operating systems or applications.[citation needed]
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